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Newly published NSA documents show agency could grab all Skype traffic

December 30, 2014 | Telepresence Options

skype-NSA

Story and images by Sean Gallagher / Ars Technica

"Sustained Skype collection" of voice, video, and messages started in 2011.

A National Security Agency document published this week by the German news magazine Der Spiegel from the trove provided by former NSA contractor Edward Snowden shows that the agency had full access to voice, video, text messaging, and file sharing from targeted individuals over Microsoft's Skype service. The access, mandated by a Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court warrant, was part of the NSA's PRISM program and allowed "sustained Skype collection" in real time from specific users identified by their Skype user names.

The nature of the Skype data collection was spelled out in an NSA document dated August 2012 entitled "User's Guide for PRISM Skype Collection." The document details how to "task" the capture of voice communications from Skype by NSA's NUCLEON system, which allows for text searches against captured voice communications. It also discusses how to find text chat and other data sent between clients in NSA's PINWALE "digital network intelligence" database.

The full capture of voice traffic began in February of 2011 for "Skype in" and "Skype out" calls--calls between a Skype user and a land line or cellphone through a gateway to the public switched telephone network (PSTN), captured through warranted taps into Microsoft's gateways. But in July of 2011, the NSA added the capability of capturing peer-to-peer Skype communications--meaning that the NSA gained the ability to capture peer-to-peer traffic and decrypt it using keys provided by Microsoft through the PRISM warrant request.

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