Gold Sponsors
Silver Sponsors
Bronze Sponsors
Telepresence Options Magazine
telepresence options catalog ad
IC14 Banner TTOP
sponsor telepresence
webrtc telepresence

Latest Telepresence and Visual Collaboration News:
Full Article:

Darpa to troubled soldiers: Meet your new simulated therapist

April 26, 2012 | Hogan Keyser
Virtual_Therapist.jpgApril 20, 2012 by Katie Drummond via ISPR -- The Pentagon hasn't made much progress in solving the PTSD crisis plaguing this generation of soldiers. Now it's adding new staff members to the therapy teams tasked with spotting the signs of emotional pain and providing therapy to the beleaguered. Only this isn't a typical hiring boost. The new therapists, Danger Room has learned, will be computer-generated "virtual humans," used to offer diagnostics, and programmed to appear empathetic.

It's the latest in a long series of efforts to assuage soaring rates of depression, anxiety and PTSD that afflict today's troops. Military brass have become increasingly willing to try just about anything, from yoga and reiki to memory-adjustment pills, that holds an iota of promise. They've even funded computerized therapy before: In 2010, for example, the military launched an effort to create an online health portal that'd include video chats with therapists.

But this project, funded by Darpa, the Pentagon's far-out research arm, is way more ambitious. Darpa's research teams are hoping to combine 3-D rendered simulated therapists -- think Sims characters mixed with ELIZA -- with sensitive analysis software that can actually detect psychological symptoms "by analyzing facial expressions, body gestures and speech," Dr. Albert Rizzo, who is leading the project alongside Dr. Louis-Philippe Morency, tells Danger Room. The therapists won't treat patients, but they will help flesh-and-blood counselors by offering a general diagnosis of what ails soldiers, and how serious the problem is.

Continue Reading...






Add New Comment

Telepresence Options welcomes your comments! You may comment using your name and email (which will not be displayed), or you may connect with your Twitter, Facebook, Google+, or DISQUS account.