Gold Sponsors
Array Telepresence Logo   Human Productivity Lab Logo   Ashton Bentley Logo
Silver Sponsors
Bronze Sponsors
Telepresence Options Magazine

Latest Telepresence and Visual Collaboration News:
Full Article:

Telephone Company Is Arm of Government, Feds Admit in Spy Suit

October 12, 2009 | Howard Lichtman
AT&T_Spying.jpgBy Ryan Singel, Via Wired.com

The Department of Justice has finally admitted it in court papers: The  nation's telecom companies are an arm of the government -- at least when it comes to secret spying.

Fortunately, a judge says that relationship isn't enough to squash a rights group's open records request for communications between the nation's telecoms and the feds.

The Electronic Frontier Foundation wanted to see what role telecom lobbying of the Justice Department played when the government began its year-long, and ultimately successful, push to win retroactive immunity for AT&T and others being sued for unlawfully spying on American citizens.

The feds argued that the documents showing consultation over the controversial telecom immunity proposal weren't subject to the Freedom of Information Act since they were protected as "intra-agency" records:

"The communications between the agencies and telecommunications companies regarding the immunity provisions of the proposed legislation have been regarded as intra-agency because the government and the companies have a common interest in the defense of the pending litigation and the communications regarding the immunity provisions concerned that common interest."

U.S. District Court Judge Jeffery White disagreed and ruled on September 24 that the feds had to release the names of the telecom employees that contacted the Justice Department and the White House to lobby for a get-out-of-court-free card.

"Here, the telecommunications companies communicated with the government to ensure that Congress would pass legislation to grant them immunity from legal liability for their participation in the surveillance," White wrote. "Those documents are not protected from disclosure because the companies communicated with the government agencies "with their own ... interests in mind," rather than the agency's interests."

The feds were supposed to make the documents available Friday, but in a motion late Thursday, the Obama administration is asking for a 30-day emergency stay (.pdf) so it can file a further appeal.

Read more at the EFF's blog.

Photo: MrBill

See Also:

    * Secret Phone Slip Shows Telco Called for Spy Help
    * Is Retroactive Telecom Immunity Unconstitutional?
    * Obama Sides With Bush in Spy Case
    * Obama to Defend Telco Spy Immunity







Add New Comment

Telepresence Options welcomes your comments! You may comment using your name and email (which will not be displayed), or you may connect with your Twitter, Facebook, Google+, or DISQUS account.